Category Archives: Racing

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Making The Case For Power To Weight Ratio Over High Bhp

The new rat race in the modern world of automotive engineering is trying to making the most horsepower producing sports cars in the world. From the Mclaren P1 hybrid producing 904 bhp and 723 lb-ft and the LaFerrari it’s the closest rival producing 950bhp and 664 lb-ft, is seems like the top supercar manufacturers right now, want to boast the largest figures. However, despite all that power, both cars still have a curb weight of around 1500kg, about the weight of an average-sized family car. Now that’s still around 600bhp per ton, but with that amount of weight, the handling undoubtedly suffers, the braking distance is longer than it could be and the acceleration also suffers. Generally speaking, lightness is the ethos of sticking a car to the tarmac and carrying great speed through corners, so why how might this be transferred to the road?

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Credit – Brian Snelson

Stripping the interior

If you want to make your car lighter, it’s easier than you think. Simply strip out anything you don’t need. Strip out the interior first. Remove the mats, car seats you don’t use, spare wheel and the jack. At this point, on average you’ll save around 20-40kg, resulting in the car becoming more balanced. Replace your passenger and driver’s seat with bucket seats that aren’t adjustable in the tradition sense i.e. rotational tilting and height. If you want to go further, you can set the seat permanently, saving a few kilograms on the rail underneath the seat.

Lower the center of gravity

For performance, you want a total 50-50 weight distribution. But the body roll will commence, albeit, to a lesser extent even if you have taken this measure. You need to hunker down the vehicle so it’s hugging the floor and closer to the wheels and suspension. Talking of suspension, buy a sports suspension that is strong, light and designed to take on lateral G loads as well as the stroke system. Buy a sporting service product from a company like GC Suspension, because for responsive handling, you’ll need a strengthened compression stroke suspension to absorb the bumps in the road.

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Image by – Bill Abbott

Applying the doctrine

Having fully committed to the doctrine of speed and performance, you now need to transfer this to the road. You need to look for a tyre which has a low profile, as the less rubber incorporated into the design, the less flex the tyre will give you. A low profile tyre will also help you to minimize skidding upon corner entry. Next, you’ll need to choose a spaced and thick tread. A tyre like the Continental SportContact 6 is great for to channel the car’s chassis and give the driver feedback on what’s going on, in terms of steering angle and grip. But don’t forget, a grasp of the road surface is just as important in wet conditions as it is in the dry. This is where the tread depth and pattern will come into play, as the key goal is to stop your car from aquaplaning. Look for a tyre which will dissipate standing water and make room for the majority of the rubber to hold onto the tarmac.

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Put Pedal To The Metal On The Track!

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Picture Source

If we’re honest with ourselves we all dream of being racing drivers. This is true whether you bought your first car twenty years ago or whether you first sat in the driver seat just last week. We all feel the urge to put the pedal to the metal and see what the car can really do.

Unfortunately, it’s not safe to do this on the roads. Trying to race on the road, while often attempted can lead to dangerous situations. Even places like Germany, where there is virtually no speed limit, prohibit street racing. Though, it has certainly been known to happen.

The smart choice, if you want to race, would be to attend a track day. A track day gives you the chance to test the strength and speed of your car against other races in a controlled environment. It’s a thrilling experience that most people find incredibly addictive. So, what do you need to know for your first track day?

Take Some Time

You might think that you can book your track day now and shop up at the weekend. Well, that could be a mistake because most people spend months preparing their car for a track day. They want to make sure it’s in tip-top shape, so if you want to win, you might want to do the same. First, take your car down to the local mechanics and get it checked out for any and all problems. Once you’ve done this, you should think about looking to make a few little improvements. For instance, you can lower the suspension slightly.

With a lowered suspension you’ll have a better feel for the car at high speeds, and this can be useful on the tracks.

Get It Delivered

It might sound like overkill but a lot of drivers, don’t drive the car to the track themselves. Instead, they hire a pro delivery service to get it taken there for them. That way, there is no chance that the car is ruined on the drive there. It can be quite a trek to get to your nearest race track. During this time, the tread on the tyres might wear out, and you don’t want that if you’ve just put new ones on. Luckily, with services offered by companies like Shiply, you can have the car there and waiting for you once you arrive. This can also mean you’re refreshed and ready to ride once you arrive at the track.

Get Racing Insurance

Track racing can get a little, shall we say, competitive. You might find that there are car drivers who don’t care about whether their car gets a few dents and scratches. If you do, you might want to look at the insurance for your car insurance. Chances are it won’t cover a track day, but you can get racers insurance. While sometimes expensive this might be useful, particularly if this is for your first time on the tracks.

Take this advice, and we’re sure you’ll have a lot of fun on your first track day.

Formula One Racing Grand Prix Circuits

Formula One racing evolved from early European Grand Prix racing. These early races here held on public streets and some of the current Grand Prix races continue to be held on them. Due to safety concerns associated with street racing, most Formula One racing events are held on circuits designed to meet the specific high performance demands of Formula One race cars.

The number of Grand Prix held each year can vary. Most of the traditional venue locations remain on the schedule year after year. However, new circuits are built and added to the schedule each year, allowing Formula One racing to expand into new international markets. As a result, the season takes drivers on a tour of well-known circuits as well as exciting new locations.

At the start of Formula One racing all of the races, except for the one race in the United States, were held in Europe. Over the years the popularity of the sport has led to the addition of circuits located around the world. In 1953 the first South American Grand Prix was held. It was followed by the addition of the African World Championship race in 1958. The 2007 season consists of 17 races, only 8 of which will be held in Europe. Formula One racing Grand Prix are now held in Europe, Asia, Australia, North American and South America.

The best know and most loved of all Grand Prix circuits is the Monaco Grand Prix in Monte Carlo. World Championship Formula One racing has been at home on the Monte Carlo circuit since 1955. The Monte Carlo circuit has changed very little over the years. The most major change occurred in 2004 when a new pit complex was added and changes were made to increase the number of spectators that could be accommodated.

The Monaco Grand Prix is the race that all Formula One racing drivers hope to win. The Monte Carlo circuit demands the best from each driver. It is a challenging and dangerous circuit. The Monaco Grand Prix separates the good from the great in Formula One racing and winners are considered among the best in Formula One racing history.

In the United States, Formula One racing is held at the Indianapolis International Speedway, nicknamed The Brickyard. Between 1950 and 1960 the Indy 500 was a World Championship round in Formula One racing. After 1960 the event was no longer part of the championship series but Formula One racers continued to participate. Indianapolis again became host of a Formula One World Championship circuit in 2000 after a new infield racing course was built. Formula One racing is growing in popularity in the United States and the circuit at Indianapolis International Speedway has contributed to the fan growth.

Many of the newer Formula One racing circuits have been designed by Hermann Tilke. The designs developed for newer circuits meet a higher safety standard than older circuits while providing access to larger audiences. Critics argue that the circuits have lost some of the character and challenges that made them popular but concede that safety is a top priority.

No matter where in the world they are located, Formula One racing Grand Prix are exciting events that test the skills of the drivers and the quality of the equipment engineering.